Anabaptist Kingdom of 1534

The Taylor-King by Anthony Arthur centered around the short-lived Anabaptist kingdom of Munster Germany in the 1530’s. Jan van Leyden (Jan Bockelson) is the focus title character but not the focus of the book. The story of what happened in Munster is so detailed and intricate that any and all historical figures take a backseat to the story itself.


Anselm’s Concept of the Resurrection to Perfect Eternal Happiness for Believers and the Resurrection to Complete Misery for Unbelievers

Anselm’s Concept of the Resurrection to Perfect Eternal Happiness for Believers and the Resurrection to Complete Misery for Unbelievers

Anselm’s Concept of the Resurrection to Perfect Eternal Happiness for Believers and the Resurrection to Complete Misery for Unbelievers

By Samson Covatch May 7, 2018

In St. Anselm’s work Cur Deus Homo he makes an interesting statement about the destiny of believers and unbelievers. He states in Book II, Chapter III that, “We know...that as humanity, had it continued in holiness, would have been perfectly happy for eternity...so, if it persevere in wickedness, it shall be likewise completely miserable forever.” The impression seems to be that happiness is the ultimate state of existence whereas misery is the ultimate punishment. If this were to be the case then why not adopt a semi-epicurean philosophy as the model for Christian piety?

Weekly Reading review #4

THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH BY JOSEPH H. LYNCH AND PHILLIP C. ADAMO CHAPTER FOURTEEN READING REVIEW BY SAMSON COVATCH

In chapter fourteen of The Medieval Church, Joseph H. Lynch and Phillip C. Adamo set in front of us the many broad and deep styles of monastic life in the twelfth century. What starts as a good idea is expanded into competing forms where some would last the test of time, and the rest will live only in the pages of history.

Weekly Reading Review #3

THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH BY JOSEPH H. LYNCH AND PHILLIP C. ADAMO CHAPTER ELEVEN READING REVIEW BY SAMSON COVATCH

In chapter eleven of The Medieval Church, Joseph H. Lynch and Phillip C. Adamo expose the concept that physical and cultural gain is not the correlation of spiritual gain. “If anyone says, ‘I love God,’ and hates his brother, he is a liar;” (1 John 4:20). This scripture is a true statement unless, of course, he is not my brother, but an other. The concept of Christendom aides us in knowing who are our Christian brothers.

Weekly reading review #2

In chapter seven of *The Medieval Church*, Joseph H. Lynch and Phillip C. Adamo reveal to us the methods and results of becoming a more educated and enlightened society. The effects of the Carolingian Renaissance were far-reaching, from the liturgical service of the Church to the Frankish aristocrats within the empire.

In section one, “Cultural Decline,” the drive to get back to the idealized orthopraxy of the early Roman Church would need to start with raising the education levels of the secular, regular, and laity with depleting monetary resources. Critical issues arose when the amount of literature was plentiful, but those who could read, understand, and teach the Latin that it was written in were few.

Weekly reading review #1

In chapter five of The Medieval Church, Joseph H. Lynch and Phillip C. Adamo articulate the genesis of major problems the Reformed and Anglican traditions will eventually call into question. The Papal-Frankish Alliance of the eighth century begins years before the normalizing of a Church/State governmental system.

In section one, “The Anglo-Saxon Missions,” we are thrust into a world of extremes. The Irish monasteries focused on Latin literacy, piety, and self-sufficiency while the culture of the continent was intellectually and morally decaying.